Chocolate Seed Crackers

Posted on: March 23, 2024. Updated on: March 23, 2024.

by Carolina Gelen

chocolate seed crackers

How to make these chocolate seed crackers

To make the seed crackers, combine the flax seeds and boiling water in a bowl. The flax seeds will be the binder for our crackers, so whatever you do, make sure you don’t skip them, it’s what holds them together. Ground flax seeds will do the job here. If you can’t get your hands on any flax seeds, chia seeds will make a great substitute.

After the flax seed mixture turned from liquid to a gooey egg white-like consistency, it’s time to add the rest of the seeds. Here you can go with one kind of seed or mix up two or three kinds, such as sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds, hemp hearts, sesame seeds and more. Bake the cracker mixture until golden and crunchy, then top with chocolate. Place the baking sheet back in the oven and allow the chocolate to reach its melting point. Spread the chocolate all over the crackers and sprinkle with flaky salt for some additional crunch. Break the bark into smaller pieces and enjoy!

chocolate seed crackers

Zhuzh it up!

Use this recipe as a base for the crackers and zhuzh it up by adding your favorite flavors! Think spices: cinnamon, cardamom, ginger, or cloves. Before layering the pan with sugar, rub the sugar with freshly zested orange zest. Not a fan of milk chocolate? Try white chocolate or dark chocolate instead.

Looking for other snacking recipes similar to these crackers? Try my beer battered olives, savory seed crackers or peanut butter chocolate cups.

Chocolate Seed Crackers

3.3 / 5. from 50

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3.3 / 5. from 50

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Servings: 8
Prep: 10 minutes
Cook: 40 minutes
Total: 50 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 cup flax seeds
  • 1 cup boiling water
  • Kosher salt
  • 2 cups mixed raw seeds, such as pumpkin, sunflower, hemp hearts, etc.
  • 4 tablespoons oil, such as extra-virgin olive oil, avocado oil, etc., plus more for greasing
  • 1/3 cup Turbinado sugar, plus more as needed
  • 200g (7 oz) chocolate

Instructions

  1. Place an oven rack in the center of the oven. Heat the oven to 400°F (205°C).
  2. To a medium bowl, add the flax seeds, boiling water, and a hefty pinch of salt. Stir and set aside for a minute or so, until the seed mixture goes from a liquid consistency to a gloopy, egg white-like consistency.
  3. Add the remaining 2 cups of mixed seeds to the mixture and stir to combine. Taste and season with a little bit more salt if needed.
  4. Lightly grease a half sheet pan with oil. Line with a sheet of parchment paper on the bottom.
  5. To the pan, add 2 tablespoons of oil. Using a pastry brush or your hands, every spread the oil on the surface. Lightly sprinkle an even layer of sugar at the bottom of the pan.
  6. Dollop the seed cracker mixture on the pan and evenly spread using a spatula in a thin, even layer that covers the surface of the pan. Using a pastry brush, brush the remaining 2 tablespoons of oil on top of the seed cracker mixture. Lightly sprinkle more sugar on top of the seeds.
  7. Bake for 25 to 28 minutes, until the seeds start to look golden. Make sure to keep an eye on the oven and check on the seed crackers every now and then.
  8. Open the oven door to release some of the heat and reset the temperature to 350°F (175°C).  Rotate the sheet pan, close the oven door and continue baking for 12 to 15 minutes, until the seed crackers look golden brown.
  9. Remove the baking sheet from the oven. Break the chocolate into chunks and evenly sprinkle the chocolate on the seed cracker bark. Return to the oven for a minute or so, until the chocolate is soft enough to spread. Using an offset spatula, spread the chocolate in an even layer on top of the crackers. Top with flaky salt and allow the bark to cool.
  10. Snap the cooled chocolate seed cracker bark into smaller pieces and your seed crackers are ready!
  11. Store in an air-tight container for 1 or 2 weeks.
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Carolina Gelen

I speak 5 languages, but my favorite way to communicate is through the universal language of food. I translate food to be more approachable and accessible for the everyday cook. I didn't grow up with a lot, so I’ve always loved thrifting and finding a good sale. That also shapes my approach to cooking: I try to make most of my recipes as affordable as possible, and that is what my SCRAPS newsletter is about. Every two weeks I will send an exclusive recipe to your inbox. Subscribe to get full access to the newsletter and website.

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